Jungle Safari Tours in Nepal

Chitwan National Park

Chitwan National ParkNepal's first and most famous national park is situated in the Chitwan Doon or the lowlands of the Inner Terai. Covering an area of 932 sq km. the park includes hilly areas of the Siwalik Range covered by deciduous sal forest. One fifth of the park is made up of the floodplains of the Narayani, Rapti, and the Reu Rivers and is covered by dense tall elephant grass interspersed with riverine forests of silk cotton (kapok), acacia and sisam trees. This ecologically diverse area is the last remaining home in Nepal for more than 300 of the endangered Asian one-horned rhinoceros and harbours one of the largest populations of the elusive and rare Bengal tiger. Besides rhino and tiger, Chitwan also supports a great variety of flora and fauna. There are four species of deer, including the spotted chittal, leopard, sloth bear, wild boar, rhesus monkey, grey langur monkey, wild dog, small wild cats, the white stockinged gaur (the world's largest wild cattle) and many other smaller animals. The swampy areas and numerous oxbow lakes of Chitwan provide a home for marsh crocodiles. In a stretch of the Narayani river is found one of the few remaining populations of the rare and endangered fish-only eating gharial, or Gangetic crocodile. Here also is found one of the world's four species of freshwater dolphins. For the ornithologist and the amateur bird-watcher the park offers excellent possibilities with more than 450 species recorded. Some of the resident specialities are several species of woodpeckers, hornbills, Bengal florican, and red-headed trogons. Winter birds such as waterfowl, Brahminy duck, pintails and bareheaded geese, amongst many other cold weather visitors are drawn by the sanctuary of the park's rivers. In the summer the forest is alive with nesting migrants such as the fabulous paradise flycatcher, the Indian pitta and parakeets.

Access:
Chitwan is easily accessible from Kathmandu, being well connected by a national highway to Bharatpur and to Sauraha. There are daily fights from October through May to Meghauli airstrip just outside the park boundary. Another exciting alternative is a two to three day raft trip down the Trishuli river to Narayanghat or directly into the western edge of the park.

Visitors can stay in one of the several lodges and camps inside or outside the park. Visitors can actively participate in exciting stalks through the forest looking for animals signs. One unique Chitwan experience is elephant back safaris in search of the one-horned rhinoceros, leopard, deer, bear, monkey and crocodile. Few visitors can ever forget the excitement of crashing through 20 feet high elephant grass and sightseeing wildlife. Apart from elephant safaris, the traveller will be happily occupied for several days with nature walks, canoe rides down the park rivers, and land-over drives through the forest.

Inquiry Now Book this trip Tell to friends






Bardia National Park

Bardia National ParkThe Bardia National Park is situated on the eastern banks of the Karnali river, about 400 kms. west of Kathmandu. The park is 968 sq kms. in area and extends from the Churia hills southward to the gentle slopes of the "Bhabhar'. The higher grounds of the Churia have dry deciduous forest of mostly hardwood sal. The porous slopes of the Bhabhar support large open grasslands known locally as 'Phantas'. These are some of the last remaining grasslands that once covered much of the Gangetic plains.

The western end of the Bardia is bounded by numerous water-ways of the Karnali which have created many large and small gravel islands. These islands and much of the lower ground area covered by a mosaic of grassland and riverine forest of acacia, sisam and the large buttressed silk cotton trees. In spring, the silk cotton blooms and the forest comes alive with scarlet flowers.

Bardia is the home of a wide variety of animals, many of which live in and around the Phantas. These open grasslands such as Baghora and Lamkoili are the best places to view animals. The most conspicuous of which is the spotted deer. Other ungulates include black buck, hog deer, samber deer, wild boar and barasingha or swamp deer. Two species of monkeys, the langur and the rhesus macaque are also present. The park is famous for its small herds of wild elephants which are rarely seen. The park also boasts a small population of the rare gharial, the marsh mugger crocodile and the Gangetic dolphin. The island of the Karnali river harbours the sub-continent's largest antelope species, the nilgai or blue bull. The Karnali and Babai rivers attract a large number of wintering waterfowl along with resident species such as herons, kingfishers and wall creepers. More than 350 bird species have been recorded in Bardia, truly a bird watcher's paradise.

Access:
To reach Bardia, take the daily flight or public bus from Kathmandu to Nepalgunj, from where it is a five hour drive to the park office at Thakurdwara. This nature sanctuary is best visit form October to April.

Inquiry Now Book this trip Tell to friends






Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve

Koshi Tappu Wildlife ReserveKoshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve lies on the flood plains of the Sapta-koshi in Saptari and Sunsari districts of eastern Nepal. The Reserve covers 175 sq. kms and was established in 1976.

Rapid and complete inundation of the reserve to depths ranging from 10 to 300 cm. occurs during the monsoon. The Sapta-Koshi river also changes its course from one season to another. The vegetation is mainly tall Khar-pater grassland with a few patches of Khair-sisso, scrub forest and deciduous mixed riverine forest.

The reserve offers important habitat for a variety of wildlife. The last surviving population (about 100 individuals) of Wild Buffalo or Arna are found here. Other mammals occurring here are hog deer, wild deer, spotted deer and blue bull.

The reserve also assists the local economy by providing fishing permits and allowing the collection of edible fruits and ferns in season.

A total of 280 different species of birds have been recorded in the reserve. These include 20 species of ducks, 2 species of ibises, many stroks, egrets, herons and the endangered swamp partridges and Bengal floricans. The endangered Gharial, Crocodile and Gangetic dolphin have been recorded in Koshi river.

Access:
Koshi Tappu is easily accessible from Kathmandu, being well connected by a national highway. There are daily flights from Kathmandu to Biratnagar and road connected Biratnagar to national highway.

Inquiry Now Book this trip Tell to friends